Tag Archives: university

Technology – The Key to Transformational Change in HE? #FutureEdTech

Guest Blog with Tribal Group

Technology has dramatically changed our lives over the last decade. Mobile technologies are more common than ever, and interwoven into every aspect of our daily lives. They guide our decisions and instantly connect us to our social circles. Technology has clearly transformed the way we communicate and do business at a fundamental level.

A recent survey The Digital Transformation of Business conducted by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services, polled 537 executives and delivered surprising insights into the transformative effects of technology on business operations, These included how:

  • Mobile is enabling new business scenarios
  • Cloud computing is driving business agility
  • Big data is helping companies innovate
  • Social channels are transforming core business processes

The survey found that business leaders are not simply deploying the four technologies to boost efficiency or reduce costs. They are embracing these technologies to develop new business models, develop new revenue streams and to drive better customer engagement.

As technologies such as social media and mobility drive engagement across education institutions, executives are looking at ways to take advantage of the deluge of information generated by these interactions to drive better student engagement and increase operational efficiencies.

“Today, we are faced with the most radical change in distance learning, technology, and logistics since the invention of the printed book.”

Institutions embracing the change

Gartner reports 25% of CEOs expected to appoint a Chief Digital Officer (CDO) by 2017 to help drive their growth objectives and drive digital strategies. What’s more, 20% of large enterprises had already appointed a data officer to lead their digital strategies by 2014. Deakin University’s new Chief Digital Officer William Confalonieri is working closely with Tribal to optimise its Student Management Systems, including SITS and Enterprise Service Desk, to drive new innovations in student service, student engagement and operational efficiency. Williams’ role is to help the university capitalise on the risks and rewards of the digital economy using a blend of business strategies and technologies to achieve this goal.

Working with the University of Wolverhampton, Tribal has delivered a proven analytics model capable of predicting student success to within 70%. This new product, Student Insight ,is self-learning and has enabled the University of Wolverhampton to reduce student attrition, while driving improved student engagement and will ultimately lead to increased student satisfaction.

These are just two examples of how Tribal is working proactively with our customers to deliver new technologies and innovations to support their digital initiatives and drive greater efficiencies.

Delivering new technologies and innovations to support our customers’ digital initiatives

As a company responsible for delivering systems to support the future needs of our education customers, we see our research and development investment as critical to enable our customers to differentiate their services and lead in what has become a very complex and challenging environment. Whether it’s developing new technologies that deliver predicative analytics to identify students at risk and understand the interactions between an institution and its customers (the student), or investing in existing products to enable anytime, anywhere access via our mobility strategy, we work hard to add tremendous value to our customers.

In addition to our technologies, we have also evolved our service offer to deliver new possibilities such as our Business Transformation Service. This innovative programme leverages our experience of over 150 implementations worldwide and the thought leadership gained from working with these customers to deliver change management and consulting in the delivery of new business models that take advantage of the new digital economy, enabling customers to realise their optimal operating models.

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Want to find out more about our views on the future of Edtech? Managing Director, Market Development Jon Baldwin will be taking part in the Industry Leaders Panel Discussion:Supporting Student Experience and Success in the 21st Centurylive at Future Edtech at 10am on 2nd June.

REGISTER FOR YOUR FREE PASS HERE.

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OIC speaker interview 3: Carolyn Brown, CIO at Durham University

In our third Ovum Industry Congress speaker interview, we capture the inspiring and enlightening thoughts of one of the top speakers at the Congress: Carolyn Brown, Chief Information Officer at Durham University.

Carolyn Brown“I am taking part in the Industry Leaders Panel discussing navigating challenges and delivering value in the digital world. I believe the notion that the IT landscape is changing is over-rated. The topics listed – the impact of automation and outsourcing, delivering ROI, evolving with industry transformation – could easily have been topics for discussion in the 1980s. I believe the purpose of the CIO and the IT department is, and always has been, to increase the NPV of their organisation. This could be done by transforming the business model, creating new products, services or assets, reducing costs or increasing efficiency. There are many routes to transformation. Sourcing strategies, agility and predicting change will always have a role.

Ovum: Thinking about the conference strapline “Strategy, Technology and the art of the possible”, what tech related innovation, transformation or invention would you hope to see in your lifetime:

Carolyn Brown: In the mid-1990s I worked on middleware design for Hewlett Packard, looking at ways we could use a network of communicating devices to change people’s world. In those days, even at HP, we had one shared mobile phone for the team. The ideas we worked on – and in some cases prototyped – included being able to phone your house to switch the heating on (nice when you want a hot bath as soon as you get in), being phoned by your car if it was broken into or by your fridge if it was switched off. We had the idea of the ‘internet of things’. What we didn’t realise was how quickly all of this would happen. That experience makes me think it is impossible to overestimate the speed of change. What I’d like to have is hypertext in my head for everything. Am I the only person who has wanted to point at the TV to find out who an actor is and what else they have appeared in? I am so used to having information at my fingertips that I expect everything to be information-rich, and am disappointed when it isn’t. Perhaps it is the “google contact lenses” that I’m looking for. The trick will be to make it non-intrusive.

Ovum: What has been the most rewarding project you worked on, and why it was rewarding?

CB: My most rewarding project is usually the most recent – right now that’s an organisational transformation and a £40M investment in infrastructure and cultural change. I’ve often saved companies millions of pounds and have found it to be less satisfying than you might think – Managing Directors surprisingly can care more about continuing their pet projects than about the bottom line. Transforming a team or revolutionising the way a business works is a tremendous high for me. Creating and delivering a new business model is fantastic – examples I’ve been involved with are the first online administration of flexible employee benefits, the first online AVC calculator for pensions, and putting smart cards on printers for secure printing. It is very satisfying to see printers everywhere today with card technology and to remember the dinner where my team came up with that idea, which was taken up very rapidly within Hewlett Packard: today I’m rolling out smart–card enabled printing across Durham University, saving paper, electricity and hundreds of thousands of pounds. I’m proud of having been part of creating that capability. A memorable, small piece of work was a few days spent improving admissions processes in a hospital – as CIO I happened to be the best business analyst available. A little analysis and automation saved 2 hours a day for nurses in admissions, leaving them free to look after patients rather than admin: the nurses were literally leaping in the air and screaming with delight when the new processes had been put in place – an image I’ll never forget. Knowing that it was improving patients’ lives as well made this highly rewarding.

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