Tag Archives: mobility

Speaker in the Spotlight with DeeDee Doke #FutureofWork

In conversation with…

deedee

DeeDee Doke, Editor
Recruiter / Recruiter.co.uk

We recently caught up with DeeDee and asked her a few questions around the future of work.

  1. What are the top 3 biggest challenges and/or opportunities you see in the FoW space?

    Challenges are: to refocus on basic human skills such as one-to-one and group communication so to best use technology and not be a slave to it; reimagining/redesigning jobs and organisational structures and operations; to align the burgeoning project work culture with a tax and benefits system; developing new ways to manage and develop workforces that operate remotely.

    Opportunities: to redefine “talent” and all of the challenges listed above!

  2. What are the main Future of Work trends you’re currently seeing from your market coverage and insight?

    A lot of “awareness-raising” going on about increasing gender diversity in certain roles and in certain career specialisms but not a lot of problem solving going on. A focus on trying to fit working parents and careers into existing kinds of roles. Some engagement in developing flexible work spaces instead of committing to long-term office leases. Much greater emphasis on creating apprenticeships. Mobility comes in different forms and varieties and has different purposes. In global mobility terms, there is an ever greater focus on talent issues within global mobility functions and on the selection of talent to mobilise and in what capacity – a standard tour of duty (two to three years), a secondment or a project which could take on a “disruptive talent” aspect.

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DeeDee will be speaking at the Future of Work Summit, taking place on the 24th November 2015, at the Amba Marble Arch (formerly known as the Thistle Marble Arch) in London. To hear from him and 25+ fantastic thought leaders in the FoW space, make sure you register for your FREE pass here.

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What can Enterprise IT learn from CES?

While the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) can sometimes amount to a bit of a screen-measuring contest, there are always things to be learned from it. Here are the top three things that enterprise IT department managers can learn from the show, in the opinion of Fredric Paul from Network World.

Lesson Number 1: Size Matters.

The 2014 CES was all about really, really big screens. We’re talking television sets the size of Jumbotrons and smartphones the size of tablets.

The giant TVs were all running at 4K or Ultra HD resolutions that demand huge amount of bandwidth but display stunning levels of detail, even when you get right up close to the screen. While they may not be an immediate hit with price-conscious consumers, you can be sure that they’re raising the bar on what employees expect from the displays they use in the workplace. Even as workers increasingly rely on tablets and super-portable Ultrabooks with relatively small screens, when they sit down and plug in at the office, they’re increasingly going to demand big-screen, high-resolution monitors on their desktops.

In the world of portable devices, it seems increasingly clear that small-screen smarpthones are going the way of flip phones. There were plenty of companies showing models with 6-inch screens, and no one was making fun of their comically large dimensions. Samsung even showed its Galaxy Note Pro — a tablet with a whoppping 12.2-inch, 4-megapixel display.

Lesson Number 2: Wearable computing will change everything.

Sure, the influx of wearable computing devices has so far been more hype than happening, more promise than performance. Most of the devices now on the market seem more proof of concept than polished product. And frankly, most of the new offerings I saw at the show didn’t change that assessment. And yet, the sheer numbers of new devices — and the intense interest in the devices by the attendees — helped convince me that we’re seeing the beginnings of a fundamental new category of products.

As that market matures and truly useful devices become available, they’re going to change the way we relate to computing yet again, and enterprise IT will have to adjust. We’ve still got a little time… Google Glass isn’t the answer, the Pebble and Samsung’s Galaxy Gear smartwatch are too ugly to take seriously (even the new Pebble Steel), and Apple’s Smartwatch is still only a rumor. But in the next year or two, wearable devices will be finding their way into enterprise networks just like smartphones did, and IT had better be ready.

Lesson Number 3: Connectivity is everything.

Buying bigger devices is only half of the equation. The continued increase in the size, number, types, and data requirements of these new devices will continue to put unprecendented pressure on connectivity and bandwidth. That’s true in the home, for mobile devcies in the field, and in enterprise offices and data centers.

Keeping all those devices humming and connecting without delays is going to be a key challenge for many companies in the coming years. Enterprises may find them spending big dollars to boost their available connectivity solutions, both wired and wireless, to let employees and customers access and create the HD content that looks so darn good on all those giant screens.

Vendors at all levels of the communications stack are pushing a wide variety of technologies to help make that happen, and it’s not yet clear which ones will predominate. But it’s a safe bet that what enterprises have in place now is not going to be good enough going forward.

Original article

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