Tag Archives: mobile first

What can Enterprise IT learn from CES?

While the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) can sometimes amount to a bit of a screen-measuring contest, there are always things to be learned from it. Here are the top three things that enterprise IT department managers can learn from the show, in the opinion of Fredric Paul from Network World.

Lesson Number 1: Size Matters.

The 2014 CES was all about really, really big screens. We’re talking television sets the size of Jumbotrons and smartphones the size of tablets.

The giant TVs were all running at 4K or Ultra HD resolutions that demand huge amount of bandwidth but display stunning levels of detail, even when you get right up close to the screen. While they may not be an immediate hit with price-conscious consumers, you can be sure that they’re raising the bar on what employees expect from the displays they use in the workplace. Even as workers increasingly rely on tablets and super-portable Ultrabooks with relatively small screens, when they sit down and plug in at the office, they’re increasingly going to demand big-screen, high-resolution monitors on their desktops.

In the world of portable devices, it seems increasingly clear that small-screen smarpthones are going the way of flip phones. There were plenty of companies showing models with 6-inch screens, and no one was making fun of their comically large dimensions. Samsung even showed its Galaxy Note Pro — a tablet with a whoppping 12.2-inch, 4-megapixel display.

Lesson Number 2: Wearable computing will change everything.

Sure, the influx of wearable computing devices has so far been more hype than happening, more promise than performance. Most of the devices now on the market seem more proof of concept than polished product. And frankly, most of the new offerings I saw at the show didn’t change that assessment. And yet, the sheer numbers of new devices — and the intense interest in the devices by the attendees — helped convince me that we’re seeing the beginnings of a fundamental new category of products.

As that market matures and truly useful devices become available, they’re going to change the way we relate to computing yet again, and enterprise IT will have to adjust. We’ve still got a little time… Google Glass isn’t the answer, the Pebble and Samsung’s Galaxy Gear smartwatch are too ugly to take seriously (even the new Pebble Steel), and Apple’s Smartwatch is still only a rumor. But in the next year or two, wearable devices will be finding their way into enterprise networks just like smartphones did, and IT had better be ready.

Lesson Number 3: Connectivity is everything.

Buying bigger devices is only half of the equation. The continued increase in the size, number, types, and data requirements of these new devices will continue to put unprecendented pressure on connectivity and bandwidth. That’s true in the home, for mobile devcies in the field, and in enterprise offices and data centers.

Keeping all those devices humming and connecting without delays is going to be a key challenge for many companies in the coming years. Enterprises may find them spending big dollars to boost their available connectivity solutions, both wired and wireless, to let employees and customers access and create the HD content that looks so darn good on all those giant screens.

Vendors at all levels of the communications stack are pushing a wide variety of technologies to help make that happen, and it’s not yet clear which ones will predominate. But it’s a safe bet that what enterprises have in place now is not going to be good enough going forward.

Original article

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Ovum predicts mobile first, mobile enterprise apps, and corporate mobility policies to be top of the CIO agenda in 2014

Richard_AbsalomEnterprise mobility will continue to be one of the hottest topics in IT, and high on the list of priorities for all CIOs, according to Ovum’s Enterprise Mobility 2014 Trends-to-Watch report*. Consumerization (i.e. the impact of technology designed first and foremost for consumers) has driven the enterprise mobility market over the last few years, and Ovum has identified the three major trends in mobile consumerization that will have the biggest impact on businesses in 2014. Mobile First (formerly BYOX World Forum), the 5th Annual edition of Ovum’s flagship enterprise mobility event, returns to London on 4-5 June 2014. Download the 2013 post-show report here.

Enterprise Mobility 2014 Trends-to-Watch:

  • Businesses will need to provide a strong multi-screen, multi-channel experience for customers and employees, as mobile devices increasingly become the first point of contact between a business and its customers (B2C), suppliers (B2B), and employees. Organisations will need to provide a slick user experience (UX) for every aspect of the business, from marketing, advertising, promotion, and sales through to internal processes, and whether the stakeholder is using a smartphone, tablet, or PC. Getting this right can be a complicated task and will require a strong focus on UX, both during the app development process and in terms of providing a corporate network with the capacity to deal with all the mobile devices demanding access to it.
  • Businesses will address the drivers of BYOD with their new comprehensive corporate mobility policies. Businesses are already responding to BYOD with CYOD (choose your own device) or COPE (corporate-owned, personally enabled) strategies – in which employees are given a choice of devices to use by their employer and may also be permitted to use them personal purposes – and we expect to see more of this in 2014. We also expect to see an increasing number of vertical or role-based mobility programs with strict corporate policies that specify mobile devices and applications (e.g. tablets provided to airline pilots).
  • Apps will drive the next phase in the evolution of enterprise mobility, creating new ways of working, and transforming existing business processes. In 2014, enterprise mobile apps will become a core part of the enterprise IT application stack. This will create challenges for the enterprise such as getting the UX right and enabling tight integration with internal systems. It also provides a big opportunity for app developers, systems integrators, and mobility management vendors. Enterprise mobility is moving away from a pure mobility or device problem to an IT corporate management problem, with secure access, content, application, and BI implications.
  • Enterprise mobility programs will extend beyond being pure connectivity and device issues for IT and business decision-makers. For organizations that already have a mobility strategy in place, the next phase will be to start mobilizing as many internal processes as possible to allow workers to perform their core tasks (beyond email) from whichever device they have to hand, from wherever they are.

Richard Absalom, senior analyst of Enterprise Mobility, at Ovum, says: “As businesses adapt to increasing consumerization and extend the range of tools and applications available to employees on all devices, enterprises and supply-side vendors alike need to be prepared for these developing trends: businesses in order to realize the full business benefits of mobile working, and vendors in order to address enterprise demand and remain relevant in a crowded, highly competitive market.”

*Read the original post on ovum.com