Tag Archives: guest post

What’s Your Work Pattern?

SAP Jam is Silver Sponsor at Future of Work Summit. The SAP Jam solution facilitates collaboration at every level of your business. Here’s what it’s all about.

Enterprises can claim a complimentary pass for Future of Work, by registering here. Take a look at the event agenda with just one click. Ovum has a strong legacy in this area, with many years research experience in enterprise mobility, collaboration, file sync and share, mobile device management and mobile application management. We are continually working with the people and organisations who are seeing the Future of Work become a reality. Moreover, our Future of Work, Mobile First and BYOX events have seen fantastic discussion with the leading lights in this growing industry sector.

Who will be the major players in the workplace of the future? What does future workplace technology look like, and who will make best use of it? Join us to find out.

Smart Cities video case study – Peterborough DNA

Read on for an excellent Smart Cities case study from Peterborough City Council, who are participating at Smart to Future Cities 2014.

Charlotte Palmer is Climate Challenge is Climate Manager from Peterborough City Council and is leading on delivery of the Peterborough DNA programme.

Peterborough DNA was created after the Peterborough was chosen as a Future City Demonstrator by the Technology Strategy Board to develop and test ways to shape a smarter city.

Peterborough DNA is being delivered by Opportunity Peterborough and Peterborough City Council focussing on growth, innovation and sustainability.

It has four main focuses of work:

Skills – Making sure Peterborough has the right skills and local talent to take advantage of emerging green markets and respond to our own sustainability challenges.

Sustainable businesses – Making sure local businesses are sustainable in all senses of the word – resilient and with low environmental impact.

Encouraging innovation – Taking entrepreneurial ideas and making them happen by providing funding, setting up an innovation hub and testing and trialling prototypes.

Open data – Cities have masses of data about population, transport, health, waste, and housing. Often this data isn’t brought together to form a whole picture. Peterborough DNA is making city data accessible and visual.

Find out more about Peterborough DNA: www.peterboroughdna.com

Twitter: @peterboroughDNA

Hear more from Charlotte on day one of the conference (29th April) at 15.25 in the Interactive Panel session on meeting the challenges of enabling smart sustainable cities.

The new industrial and communication revolution of Smart Cities

A guest Smart Cities blog post by Vitor Pereira. We’re closing in on Ovum’s Smart to Future Cities event, taking place in London on April 29-30. We’ve got representatives from 40+ global cities and administrative boroughs on the attendee list – make sure you’re there too.

The new industrial and communication revolution of Smart Cities

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(Source: irvingcommons.org)

We have observed over the past couple of years that themes related to Smart Cities have been on the rise. In 2013, for example, it was noted that it was a turning point. The emphasis of the speech was focused on the analysis of the meaning of “Smart City”, in the perception of the current state and concepts implementation phase, including market viability in the certification of many of these same concepts.

We realize that there has been a huge effort, especially on behalf of the industry and of the main economic agents in the market, in disseminating their solutions, finding partnerships in cities and within the territories, going back to 4 or 5 years ago, when huge projects of Smart Cities occupied many towns and many newspapers pages. However, as paper airplanes, many of these projects have been unsuccessful, inadequate, perhaps excessively megalomaniac, without proper intelligence or financial sustainability in their planning, guidance, implementation and monitoring. Many of them were in ineffective. But they had a contribution. They paved the way for the actual scenario. They forced the industry and key economic agents to assume a more responsible role in organizing the concepts and their implementation.

Also the institutional partners, such as Governments and cities, with the integration of some sustainability objectives in their plans of action, put aside many of the infamous megalomanias of the past years. Many of the major world cities today references in the panorama of Smart Cities chose the path of creativity and offered an active role to citizens and, not least, also opened paths of innovation and economic development, through the focus on entrepreneurship, startups and private projects, even more fundamental, promoting partnerships with small and medium enterprises already in possession of know-how accumulated over the years and because of their small size and flexibility, many of them managed to stay floating during the turbulent waters of the recent crisis. They evolved in a sustainable way, hired the right professional staff and managed to also perform and demonstrate some relevant projects that are of utmost importance nowadays.

On the other hand, universities and educational institutions also noticed the need, in many cases to join efforts in research and development of new products that effectively adjust to the real world, to cities and citizens.

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