Tag Archives: enterprise mobility

Speaker in the Spotlight with DeeDee Doke #FutureofWork

In conversation with…

deedee

DeeDee Doke, Editor
Recruiter / Recruiter.co.uk

We recently caught up with DeeDee and asked her a few questions around the future of work.

  1. What are the top 3 biggest challenges and/or opportunities you see in the FoW space?

    Challenges are: to refocus on basic human skills such as one-to-one and group communication so to best use technology and not be a slave to it; reimagining/redesigning jobs and organisational structures and operations; to align the burgeoning project work culture with a tax and benefits system; developing new ways to manage and develop workforces that operate remotely.

    Opportunities: to redefine “talent” and all of the challenges listed above!

  2. What are the main Future of Work trends you’re currently seeing from your market coverage and insight?

    A lot of “awareness-raising” going on about increasing gender diversity in certain roles and in certain career specialisms but not a lot of problem solving going on. A focus on trying to fit working parents and careers into existing kinds of roles. Some engagement in developing flexible work spaces instead of committing to long-term office leases. Much greater emphasis on creating apprenticeships. Mobility comes in different forms and varieties and has different purposes. In global mobility terms, there is an ever greater focus on talent issues within global mobility functions and on the selection of talent to mobilise and in what capacity – a standard tour of duty (two to three years), a secondment or a project which could take on a “disruptive talent” aspect.

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DeeDee will be speaking at the Future of Work Summit, taking place on the 24th November 2015, at the Amba Marble Arch (formerly known as the Thistle Marble Arch) in London. To hear from him and 25+ fantastic thought leaders in the FoW space, make sure you register for your FREE pass here.

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The Future of Work Summit, live!

The 2nd annual Future of Work Summit is currently taking place, with 130+ attendees discussing the latest trends in enterprise mobility management, collaboration, mobile device management, apps and file sync & share. With keynote sessions and industry leadership panel discussions from the likes of Aon, BBC, Greenpeace, Wipro, SAP, Telstra, Linklaters, and Ealing, Hammersmith & West London College, there has been a great deal of knowledge-sharing at the event, with more to come! Here is a selection of the best photos from the day so far:

“Businesses need to realize that they need to market themselves to their existing employees far more than to prospective new ones”

Ahead of Future of Work Summit, we caught up with Peter Armstrong and Len Epp, co-founders of Dashcube, Innovation Sponsor of the event. In a fascinating, in-depth discussion, they explore their perspectives on the future workplace and technology, and their experience to date.

Peter Armstrong: At Future of Work, I am most looking forward to hearing the perspectives that different people we talk with have about the future of work. At Dashcube, we have been thinking about this for a long time, and building our thinking about the future of distributed collaboration into the product. We really value conferences such as Future of Work since they give us the chance to get out of the proverbial building and do the customer development process, talking with people and learning more about their business problems and testing our assumptions about what we are doing with our technology.

I believe the Future of Work means that distributed teams are not optional, and the tools and processes which need to evolve to support them can also be applied effectively to teams which have the luxury of being in the same building. I believe the Future of Work will be fantastic, since social forces such as so-called “millennial entitlement” will mean that people won’t settle for bad tools and oppressive processes. Fundamentally, the Future of Work will be about people, and about how better to use technology to connect people and then get out of the way.

Ovum: From a learning experience viewpoint, what has been your most valuable lesson in your working career, or your most successful failure?

Peter Armstrong: My most successful failure was trying to productize the concepts in my first book, Flexible Rails, into a commercial framework. While the framework was technically strong, largely due to the efforts of my cofounder, it failed spectacularly as a commercial product. However, the experience led to the formation of my boutique consultancy, which led to the creation of Leanpub, which led to me working with my old friend Len and to meeting Chris, and to us creating Dashcube together. In terms of lessons, the main lesson it taught me was that doing public-facing things that genuinely try to improve some small subset of the world can lead to totally unexpected successes with people you have never met.

Ovum: What technology would you like to see changing the way we do business in the future?

Peter Armstrong: I would love to see the Apple Watch and its inevitable imitators eliminate the security disaster and overstuffed wallet that is the reality with modern-day credit cards. Len wants it to open doors too, but if it just fixes payments then I’ll be happy. Paying for stuff is a disaster.

Ovum: Describe your ideal working environment 10 years from now?

Len Epp: Regarding wearables, I believe the biggest change in our working environments is that we are going to be using smartwatches as our keys, not just for unlocking doors, but also for unlocking our devices and even our apps. This will have a profound impact on the way every enterprise manages security for its people, physical assets, its IP and its data.  Here’s a blog post I wrote a few weeks ago (before the Apple Watch launch) that goes into some more detail on how watches will become keys (and wallets): https://medium.com/@lenepp/why-smartwatches-should-be-keys-and-wallets-e141facb95ad

Ovum: What in your opinion will be the next big change in the way that we work and the way in which businesses engage with their employees – and specifically the way IT has to service their customers?

Peter Armstrong: Businesses need to realize that they need to market themselves to their existing employees far more than to prospective new ones.  Continue reading

Experimenting with new technology, stretching the limits of what is possible, developing solutions

Martin SadlerMartin Sadler is the Head of IT and Shared Services at Walsall Council. He has led the IT service for 7 years and delivered significant technical projects and cultural change; prior to that he worked for Fujitsu Services in the Retail and Financial services. This gives him a rare perspective of being able to look at the Future of Work through the eyes of a supplier, enterprise and public sector agency. He is a devotee of home grown solutions, open source products and anything that make life simpler or better value. We caught up with him to talk about this, about his role as a public sector IT leader and about his thoughts on the industry.

“My most valuable experience is that some people will only be happy if they have something to complain about”

Firstly, when thinking about the Future of Work Summit, Martin is “most looking forward to hearing more from people who are ahead of the work anywhere curve. I am discussing the move to mobility and smarter working in local government at Future of Work; I believe that I have experiences that others do not need to repeat”.

“My most valuable experience is that some people will only be happy if they have something to complain about. This led to the need to do changes sequentially in order to pinpoint what the real issue is”.

“Respond quickly; have integrity; explain thoroughly”

The complexity of a local council is unique in business terms, and presents a lot of challenges for an IT leader. Martin knows this as well as anyone, affirming that “[a council] has conflicting purposes and more diverse activities than any reasonable organisation would be expected to do”. To manage this challenge, he sets in place clear generic activities: “respond quickly; have integrity; explain thoroughly; with a huge degree of flexibility in how and when services are provided”.

There is currently a big drive towards smarter working within the public sector, with a need for increased efficiency in IT delivery, which, while exciting in many ways, presents a challenge in itself. As Martin puts it, “The diversity and number of legacy systems is a real impediment as is the pace of suppliers to convert their applications to be web based. This is then hampered by the price of providing a hosted solution”. And then, paraphrasing Einstein, “never underestimate the ability of groups of people to do stupid things”.

On a more positive note, we spoke about what Martin’s most rewarding project of his career has been: the Rolling out of Thin Clients across Walsall Council, which he describes as “one of the most exciting things I have achieved. The mix of experimenting with new technology, stretching the limits of what is possible and seeing the staff develop the solutions has been fantastic”.

Continue reading

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Ovum predicts mobile first, mobile enterprise apps, and corporate mobility policies to be top of the CIO agenda in 2014

Richard_AbsalomEnterprise mobility will continue to be one of the hottest topics in IT, and high on the list of priorities for all CIOs, according to Ovum’s Enterprise Mobility 2014 Trends-to-Watch report*. Consumerization (i.e. the impact of technology designed first and foremost for consumers) has driven the enterprise mobility market over the last few years, and Ovum has identified the three major trends in mobile consumerization that will have the biggest impact on businesses in 2014. Mobile First (formerly BYOX World Forum), the 5th Annual edition of Ovum’s flagship enterprise mobility event, returns to London on 4-5 June 2014. Download the 2013 post-show report here.

Enterprise Mobility 2014 Trends-to-Watch:

  • Businesses will need to provide a strong multi-screen, multi-channel experience for customers and employees, as mobile devices increasingly become the first point of contact between a business and its customers (B2C), suppliers (B2B), and employees. Organisations will need to provide a slick user experience (UX) for every aspect of the business, from marketing, advertising, promotion, and sales through to internal processes, and whether the stakeholder is using a smartphone, tablet, or PC. Getting this right can be a complicated task and will require a strong focus on UX, both during the app development process and in terms of providing a corporate network with the capacity to deal with all the mobile devices demanding access to it.
  • Businesses will address the drivers of BYOD with their new comprehensive corporate mobility policies. Businesses are already responding to BYOD with CYOD (choose your own device) or COPE (corporate-owned, personally enabled) strategies – in which employees are given a choice of devices to use by their employer and may also be permitted to use them personal purposes – and we expect to see more of this in 2014. We also expect to see an increasing number of vertical or role-based mobility programs with strict corporate policies that specify mobile devices and applications (e.g. tablets provided to airline pilots).
  • Apps will drive the next phase in the evolution of enterprise mobility, creating new ways of working, and transforming existing business processes. In 2014, enterprise mobile apps will become a core part of the enterprise IT application stack. This will create challenges for the enterprise such as getting the UX right and enabling tight integration with internal systems. It also provides a big opportunity for app developers, systems integrators, and mobility management vendors. Enterprise mobility is moving away from a pure mobility or device problem to an IT corporate management problem, with secure access, content, application, and BI implications.
  • Enterprise mobility programs will extend beyond being pure connectivity and device issues for IT and business decision-makers. For organizations that already have a mobility strategy in place, the next phase will be to start mobilizing as many internal processes as possible to allow workers to perform their core tasks (beyond email) from whichever device they have to hand, from wherever they are.

Richard Absalom, senior analyst of Enterprise Mobility, at Ovum, says: “As businesses adapt to increasing consumerization and extend the range of tools and applications available to employees on all devices, enterprises and supply-side vendors alike need to be prepared for these developing trends: businesses in order to realize the full business benefits of mobile working, and vendors in order to address enterprise demand and remain relevant in a crowded, highly competitive market.”

*Read the original post on ovum.com

Mobile Application Management: the Apperian perspective

Apperian is the Mobile Application Management sponsor at Future of Work Summit. Alan Murray, SVP of Products, has been sharing his thoughts on the enterprise mobility industry, as well as what Mobile Application Management entails. Over to Alan…

Alan

1. What is the current state of the enterprise mobility vendors?

2013 saw a number of acquisitions and messaging shifts in the mobility marketplace. Some companies that started as MDM vendors are now expanding their messaging to include MAM and MCM, but most are just a thin veneer of capabilities draped over an MDM platform. These “do-it-all” platforms, in our experience, can’t deliver on the promises made by their marketing departments to their customers. On the other end of the spectrum, pure-play companies specializing in particular aspects of enterprise mobility are allowing organizations to select best-of-breed solutions. Some specialize in security, app reputation analysis or, like Apperian, providing MAM.

2. What trends are you seeing in this space?

The biggest trend we see is the shift from devices to apps. With IT replacing their Blackberry Enterprise Server with any number of commoditized MDM vendors, mobile IT leaders are now looking for transformative ways to use mobility. While IT is no longer panicking over device management, they are starting to realize that trying to use MDM technology to manage and secure apps doesn’t work. When we exhibit at enterprise mobility trade shows, the discussions we have with attendees now, as compared to a year ago, have universally gone from “how do we secure our corporate devices” to “how do we build, manage and secure enterprise apps?”. We no longer find ourselves having to spell out the the acronym “MAM”, although there is still a lot of education needed for organizations to realize that MAM is more than just a private app store and that the real value lies within the management of the app lifecycle.

3. There seems to be confusion on the definition of MAM – Can you help clarify?

The term “MAM” has unfortunately been watered down by many mobile vendors and people in the media to simply mean a private app store. But the App Store is really the “last mile” of enabling a mobile strategy. We have a broader and deeper aspiration for MAM to encompass managing the entire mobile app lifecycle from development to deployment without regard or reliance on a device management infrastructure. MAM is about driving innovation through mobility and ultimately driving adoption of corporate apps.

4. Have you seen any new or unique use cases for MAM?

One reoccurring trend we’ve seen is organizations using Apperian’s MAM solution to facilitate user testing for consumer-facing apps internally. Organizations are able to deploy an app to thousands of internal end-users for testing before it becomes part of a public app store. Through our app policies, an administrator can view statistics through usage tracking to better understand app download and usage behavior, while end-users can provide feedback directly through our app store. Our App Remote Control policy allows an admin to remotely view and control the user interface of an app, therefore providing live support for troubleshooting and ultimately saving time and expenses.

5. How can Apperian help?

Apperian’s cloud-based mobile app management platform helps to secure and manage corporate mobile apps and data in the enterprise. Our solution ensures ongoing compliance with security policies and simplifies managing all stages of the mobile app lifecycle, streamlining the complexity of supporting ever-changing versions of apps, operating systems and devices – whether personal (BYOD) or corporate owned. Through a seamless user experience that doesn’t require intrusive technology on user devices, Apperian powers the world’s leading enterprise app stores for hundreds of thousands of users.