Category Archives: Ovum Content

Making the most of your Information Investments: Webinar with Ovum & Canon

When: Thursday 28th May 2015 at 14:00

In today’s always-on working environment, knowledge workers are overloaded with information. Even though investments in information management have been on the rise, the tools and training that workers need to properly share, store and use this information are often lacking – resulting in a loss of efficiency and productivity. Ovum and Canon have brought together a range of primary research studies, getting to understand the point of view of both end-users and enterprise IT departments around how they use and manage information.

Join us to examine:

• The scale of the information mis-management problem
• The potential solutions to it
• The benefits of getting information management right

Ovum in partnership with Canon, are offering an introductory webinar to help today’s businesses making the most of their information investments. Please join us.

Register for FREE here!

The Speakers

CanonQuentyn Taylor
Director of Information Security
Canon Europe Ltd

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OvumRichard Absalom
Senior Analyst
Enterprise Mobility and Productivity
Ovum

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About Canon

Canon Europe is the regional sales and marketing operation for Canon Inc., represented in 116 countries and employing 17,000 people across Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA).

Founded in 1937 with the specific goal of making the best quality camera available to customers, Canon’s tireless passion for the Power of Image has since extended its technology into many other markets and has established it as a world leader in both consumer and business imaging solutions.

Its solutions comprise products, ranging from digital compact and SLR cameras, through broadcast lenses and portable X-ray machines, to multi-function and production printers, all supported by a range of value added services.

Canon invests heavily in R&D to deliver the richest and most innovative products and services to satisfy customers’ creative needs. From amateur photographers to professional print companies, Canon enables each customer to realise their own passion for image.

Canon’s corporate philosophy is Kyosei – ‘living and working together for the common good’. In EMEA, Canon Europe pursues sustainable business growth, focusing on reducing its own environmental impact and supporting customers to reduce theirs using Canon’s products, solutions and services. Canon has achieved global certification to ISO 14001, demonstrating a world-class environmental management standard.

Further information about Canon Europe is available at: www.canon-europe.com

Register for FREE here!

Smart City funding and finance: where’s the money, and who’s paying?

Show me the money

A highly important factor when thinking about smart cities, that isn’t always discussed, is how to fund and finance them. As exciting as it is to discuss the potential, exciting developments that smart cities can bring, whether in terms of urban development, citizen engagement or sustainability, they won’t get off the ground without funding. This is something that has not escaped Ovum’s Smart to Future Cities conference, with a dedicated set of presentations around funding options.

Firstly we have a case study from the Province of Torino, Italy, on Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) for smart city projects/financing future cities in the EU, in which they will outline the 2020Together project, detail its funding strategy, and examine the new forms of partnership between public administrations and private investors.

This is followed by an interactive panel session: attracting funding and finance for smart infrastructure projects. The panellists include Scott Cain, Executive Director, Future Cities Catapult and Frank Lee, Head of Financial Instruments, Western Europe, European Investment Bank, with discussion points including:

  • What are the different funding instruments available?
  • Best practice for attracting interest from institutional investors and investment banks
  • Financial instruments outside EU funding
  • ‘Joint venture’ infrastructure projects
  • PPPs for smart city projects
  • Sharing risk in PPPs, managing exit strategies and forecasting returns
  • The need for a smart bank for smart investment

The panel is introduced by Mathias Reddmann, from the Smart Cities and Sustainability Unit of the European Commission, in which he will address the need for large-scale investment in smart cities, detailing the Horizon 2020 and JESSICA initiatives.

This dedicated session is part of a comprehensive event, covering transport, energy, urban development, assisted living, sustainability, security and resilience, among 19+ global city case studiesDownload the brochure to see which cities will be speaking at the event, and find out what they’ll be discussing. Then book your ticket to join in the discussion!

Urban IoT: what is it, and what does it mean for cities and citizens?

Mit Verteilnetzautomatisierung aus einer Hand zum Smart Grid / Creating the smart grid with distribution automation from a single source

The Internet of Things (IoT) is everywhere. As recognised by its position at the very peak of inflated expectations on Gartner’s 2014 Hype Cycle for emerging technologies, and the volume of Ovum research taking it into account, anyone working in or with the technological sector in 2015 will not be able to escape it.

A high-level definition of IoT is the ability of ‘things’ (whether that be beings or objects) to be set up to communicate with each other and transfer data without human prompting. IoT-esque technology is well-established in processes such as container tracking and fleet management, but it is increasingly moving into the mainstream in many forms. In this post we’ll be discussing the dawn of urban IoT.

While urban IoT may sound like a buzzword, it is garnering enough attention to pay serious consideration to it. It was mentioned several times during the research period of the Smart to Future Cities Summit 2015, and there has been a queue of volunteers to discuss it at the event. So in the context of a smart city, what does it signify?

Firstly, a bit of background: the world’s population is increasingly urban: 54% of the world’s population live in urban areas, an increase of 58% since 1960 ; this figure is forecast to grow a further 72% by 2050. The world’s population is also increasingly connected: mobile access to the internet now exceeds fixed access, and there are more devices connected to the internet than there are people in the world . The scene for urban IoT has been set, with usage proposals on the increase.

One such use is in the energy market. Urban IoT is ready-made for the production and distribution of smart sustainable energy for the city. Energy efficiency and use of renewables is crucial for cities; what city administrations must do is evaluate different technologies and innovations for smart energy, and integrate smart grids into cities. This is where IoT comes into play – when grids ‘think’ for themselves, storing energy from renewable and traditional sources, and supplying it where appropriate and required, energy becomes more efficient, reducing the city’s carbon footprint.

Another practical use for urban IoT is in Assisted Living, specifically by exploiting IoT and ICT software to enable patients to receive medical care and support at home. Integrating smart home, telecare and smart city technologies and services will meet the needs of aging populations within cities, developing services that enable elderly people to live independently, improving their standard of living.

Central to urban IoT (and IoT generally) is the sheer amount of data generated, and management of this Big Data. This can be done by adding an intelligence layer to existing city infrastructure, and/or by building IoT frameworks in to city platforms, allowing cities to manage real time data, and effectively analyse urban data. Moreover, there is a public safety requirement: effectively managing and processing large volumes of data gives public safety personnel the optimum tools and information to respond to critical situations, enhancing city resilience. If these personnel can access data to enhance situational awareness; integrate and visualise data from different sources to identify risk; link data to first responders smart phones, their job becomes easier and a city becomes safer. The automated nature of IoT is ready-made for this application.

future smart city

These are just a few examples of how urban IoT and Smart Cities go hand in hand. What national governments and supra-national organisations have uppermost in their mind is developing standards and protocols for future city governance and IoT management. This includes creating frameworks of best practice for smart city projects, collaboration on city services, managing risks and resilience in developing smarter cities and communities, and developing a city protocol as a practical way to effectively manage urban IoT.

Over and above all this, however, we must not overlook the human factor. As IoT and wearable technology becomes more a part of the daily life of the inhabitants of cities, technological development in the fabric of the city will feel more natural to them. Therefore if urban IoT enables smart citizens in the resilient, smart city, it has met its objectives. Watch this space.

Find out more about urban IoT at Smart to Future Cities Summit 2015, London, 28-29 April, where 50+ industry leaders, including 19 global smart city case studies, will present their view of the smart city market. City/government administrations can claim a complimentary pass.

Smart Future Cities

Image accreditation 1: http://www.siemens.com/press/photo/soicsg201302-01e
Image accreditation 2: https://www.infobright.com/index.php/exactly-smart-city

First speakers announced for Smart to Future Cities 2015

london smart city

The first speakers have been announced for the 4th Annual Smart to Future Cities 2015, and the draft agenda is now available to download.

Event background

Taking place at the Waldorf Hilton in London, on 28-29 April 2015, the Smart to Future Cities conference has gone from strength to strength over recent years, charting the transition of the smart city concept from definition to implementation as IoT enables applications that benefit citizens and urban planners. In April 2014 we hosted over 250 industry experts, 80 of whom were from international city administrations.

The conference is renowned for being the right size for constructive discussion and networking where cities can talk directly to other cities; as our delegates said:

“The Smart Cities conference 2014 was an outstanding experience. Several of the conversations I had during the conference have translated into tangible projects with real outcomes” – Future Cities Lab

“There is the possibility to meet important and significant people at an event that is the right size. It is not a large expo, where you get lost in the crowd ” – Bilbao City Council

“Great line up of speakers and very insightful. I felt I was learning at the leading edge of Smart City thinking” – Milton Keynes Council

“One of the best SMART Cities event I’ve been to. A good mix of speakers and delegates.” – Happold Consulting

2015 sees the concept of Smart Cities continuing to evolve as the focus shifts to the citizen and their central place in the design of the smart city and the IoT applications and services that enable it. Services such as smart parking, mobility, energy, health, safety and security and many more are enabled by urban IoT as everything within the city becomes internet connected.

Agenda and speakers

Download the draft agenda here, to see what will be up for discussion. Our early-confirmed speakers include:

Ger Baron, Chief Technology Officer, City of Amsterdam

Cllr James Noakes, Mayoral lead for Energy and Smart City, Liverpool City Council

Geoff Snelson, Director of Strategy, Corporate Core, Milton Keynes

Petra Dalunde, Project manager and Communication Strategist at Stockholm Business Region Development, City of Stockholm

Dave Carter, Chair, European Connected Smart Cities Network – Centre for Urban Policy Studies (CUPS), Manchester, UK

Josu Santacruz, Smart Cities, Centro Informático Municipal de Bilbao (Cimubisa), Spain

Steve Turner, Head of City Policy, Manchester

Vojko Obersnel , Mayor of the City of Rijeka, Croatia

Erling Fossen, CEO – Oslo Metropolitan Area, Oslo – Norway

Else Kloppenborg, Special Adviser, Smart Cities, City of Copenhagen

Veera Mustonen, Project Leader, Smart Kalasatama, City of Helsinki

Michael McLaughlan, Programme Director, Glasgow Future Cities Demonstrator Programme

Richard Miller, Head of Sustainability, Technology Strategy Board

See-Kiong Ng, Programme Director, Institute for Infocomm Research – Singapore

Loveleen Garg, Assistant Vice President, Gujarat International Finance Tech City Co. Ltd

Ahmed Jebreel Fallatah, Telecom Project Manager, Telecoms, Royal Commission for Yanbu, Saudi Arabia

Andrew Collinge, Head of Intelligence, Greater London Authority

Shane Rooney, Executive Director, Smart Cities & Transport, GSMA

Chris Pennell, Lead Analyst, Public Sector, Ovum

SmartFutureCities_logo_2015 (2)

“BPM is only a milestone in the journey of process excellence”

With Ovum’s 6th Annual Business Process Management Forum taking place in November 2014, we gathered the thoughts of Deepa Tambe, Business Process Management and Improvement Manager at Lloyd’s Register, on her experience, her hopes from the event and her thoughts on enterprise BPM.

Firstly, something that we are always interested to find out is whether BPM experts have a mantra that they would recommend BPM practitioners to recite when undertaking their projects. Deepa has, and it is an excellent one: ‘BPM is only a milestone in the journey of process excellence’.

Our thoughts move on to BPM Forum; Deepa is discussing Organising BPM at the event, believing that an organisation’s culture plays a major role in the success or failure of the BPM project. When thinking about other case studies on the day, she is particularly looking forward to hearing from Alistair Watters from B&Q, on ‘Culture eats Strategy’, as she wants to hear his view on “transformation in the retail market, as it is changing very fast”.

With many years’ experience under her belt (or should that be under her Black Belt?), and with extensive experience of implementing business process management and improvement projects within various sectors including IT, Telecom, Education, Manufacturing and Engineering, we talk about some of the challenges of her job. Straight away, the main one is “encouraging people to use any system”. In an organisation where there is a mixture of experienced (30 years plus) colleagues, and a younger generation who are more intuitive with new technology, it is challenging to keep a right balance to enthuse all people. While younger colleagues easily take in, and almost demand, technology automation and updates, it can be sometimes seen as a complexity for the senior members of staff, who are the pillars of the organisation. So what is the best way to deal with this? “The only way to manage is through communication – at all levels and types”.

Going from the actual to the conceptual, we ask Deepa what one thing she would implement tomorrow if she knew success was guaranteed. Her answer is straightforward (and in fact echoes a recent Future of Work interview with Walsall Council): “Green Power!”. Specifically in terms of the volume of chargers and power leads, which accumulate with each new gadget that is launched. “If only we could have all gadgets on solar or wireless power, it would make life so much simpler”.

Finally, and still looking to the future, we ask what Deepa sees as the coming trends in BPM, and how to prepare for this. She replies that “social media, collaboration and mobility in terms of processes, people and technology are the trends impacting ways of working. The only way to prepare for this is by listening and engaging with people”.

Wise words, for sure. You can view all of the topics to be discussed at BPM Forum on the event agenda, and you can discuss these topics and more with Jacqui, and all our speakers, by registering today (enterprise end-users can claim a complimentary pass).

New BPM Ovum Live

Experimenting with new technology, stretching the limits of what is possible, developing solutions

Martin SadlerMartin Sadler is the Head of IT and Shared Services at Walsall Council. He has led the IT service for 7 years and delivered significant technical projects and cultural change; prior to that he worked for Fujitsu Services in the Retail and Financial services. This gives him a rare perspective of being able to look at the Future of Work through the eyes of a supplier, enterprise and public sector agency. He is a devotee of home grown solutions, open source products and anything that make life simpler or better value. We caught up with him to talk about this, about his role as a public sector IT leader and about his thoughts on the industry.

“My most valuable experience is that some people will only be happy if they have something to complain about”

Firstly, when thinking about the Future of Work Summit, Martin is “most looking forward to hearing more from people who are ahead of the work anywhere curve. I am discussing the move to mobility and smarter working in local government at Future of Work; I believe that I have experiences that others do not need to repeat”.

“My most valuable experience is that some people will only be happy if they have something to complain about. This led to the need to do changes sequentially in order to pinpoint what the real issue is”.

“Respond quickly; have integrity; explain thoroughly”

The complexity of a local council is unique in business terms, and presents a lot of challenges for an IT leader. Martin knows this as well as anyone, affirming that “[a council] has conflicting purposes and more diverse activities than any reasonable organisation would be expected to do”. To manage this challenge, he sets in place clear generic activities: “respond quickly; have integrity; explain thoroughly; with a huge degree of flexibility in how and when services are provided”.

There is currently a big drive towards smarter working within the public sector, with a need for increased efficiency in IT delivery, which, while exciting in many ways, presents a challenge in itself. As Martin puts it, “The diversity and number of legacy systems is a real impediment as is the pace of suppliers to convert their applications to be web based. This is then hampered by the price of providing a hosted solution”. And then, paraphrasing Einstein, “never underestimate the ability of groups of people to do stupid things”.

On a more positive note, we spoke about what Martin’s most rewarding project of his career has been: the Rolling out of Thin Clients across Walsall Council, which he describes as “one of the most exciting things I have achieved. The mix of experimenting with new technology, stretching the limits of what is possible and seeing the staff develop the solutions has been fantastic”.

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Jacqui Whiskey, BG Group, on BPM, Process Excellence and Business Change

Jacqui Whiskey, Business Process Lead at BG Group is speaking at Ovum’s 6th Annual Business Process Management Forum, taking place at Thistle Marble Arch on 18th November 2014. She will be participating in an Industry Leaders Panel Discussion entitled BPM as a vehicle to deliver agility and reduce costs – Finding the holy grail, alongside senior representatives from TNT Express and Maersk Group. We caught up with her to talk about the key moments in her career, her thoughts on BPM and her aspirations from the conference.

Jacqui WhiskeyOvum: BPM Mantras – please share with us with your favourite BPM or work adage?

Jacqui Whiskey: Keep in close contact with your customers/end users to understand their changing needs and environment. This will ensure you can react effective and maintain your relationship
At Business Process Management Summit 2014, I am most looking forward to meeting other BPM practitioners, sharing experience and understanding some of the challenges they have faced in the past and the methods employed to overcome those challenges.

Ovum: From a learning experience viewpoint, what has been your most valuable lesson in your working career?

JW: Ensure you understand the environment in which you operate and how it impacts you and your business, because we live in a rapidly changing global business environment. Also, build a cross functional professional network that you can call on if you need to. The biggest mistake a Business Process Practitioner can do is believe they can solve everything on your own, there will always be someone who has gone through a similar experience and can share their lessons learnt. A very strong professional network can easily assist you to focus in the right direction.

Ovum: What are some of the challenges of your job?

JW: One of the main challenges of my job is getting Stakeholders to make decisions at the right time and identifying, tracking and delivering benefits against a clear objective. We tend to operate in silos, and if key Stakeholders do not have a vested interest in the success of a project or the authority to make on the spot decisions, it will be extremely difficult realise the planned benefits. Other challenges faced are being able to transition from fire-fighting state to leading the Business Change process.

Ovum: What one thing would you implement tomorrow if you knew success was guaranteed?

JW: I would implement a central Business Change management team with oversight across all projects and business activities. This high performing team will ensure all interdependencies and its potential impact on the deliverables are identified; mitigation plans developed and effective communication are issued to all stakeholders to reduce the impact of these changes to the business operations. I believe timely, effective and targeted communication with customers and end users will ensure project success.

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