Category Archives: Guest/Sponsored post

How do we change the culture of higher education to support and enable true transformation? #FutureEdTech

Guest Blog with Oracle

oracleIt’s certainly no secret that higher education globally is under going significant change. While it’s always difficult to have clear perspective when one is in the middle of a shift or period of dynamism, I believe this change is more profound than any we’ve seen in our lifetimes as higher education professionals, but I will also say that the change yet to come in the next 5-10 years is likely to be even more significant. Technology is underpinning a lot of these changes, but questions of culture, tradition, and historical precedent are being considered alongside discussions of the overall cost of education, the “return on investment,” student experience, and what truly defines “institutional excellence,” all questions that we hope to address at some stage during our upcoming participation in the Ovum Future EdTech conference in London.

All of us have been exposed to extremist predictions of massive reductions in the number of higher education institutions as a result of financial pressures and declining enrollment; the advent of MOOC’s (massive open online courses) and their purported ability to essentially replace the traditional model of delivering education content; the rapid ascent (and subsequent decline) of certain for-profit models of education; and in technology circles how everything “cloud” will allegedly solve all of our problems, financial as well as technical, and “solve world hunger” at the same time.

But lost in a lot of this hyperbole are a number of nuggets of positive change that have come from some of the forces I’ve just outlined. We’ve seen significant improvements in the delivery of education content through flipped classrooms and blended learning environments. MOOC’s haven’t replaced the traditional models of delivering education but they have had a positive influence on how students can be more effectively engaged and can learn at their own pace, while advances in technology have made on-line learning very interactive and engaging versus the passive models of the past.

In the “back office” of higher education, there has been significant pressure to drive operational efficiencies because of the draw-down over the past decade in public funding support for education, and as a result, albeit slowly, higher education has begun to adopt modern and more standard business processes in areas where bespoke process does not contribute significantly to the overall mission of teaching, learning and research. Furthermore because of the increased expectations around the “return on investment” in education, since more and more of the cost is being shouldered by the student and parent, more focus and emphasis is being placed on the overall student experience.

oracle2Underpinning all of this is a statistic I’d like to cite that comes from a survey conducted in the US annually by Casey Green of the Campus Computing Project that points to executive leadership (Vice Chancellors, Presidents, Provosts, etc.) of most institutions being significantly less sanguine about the effectiveness of IT investments in advancing the overall mission of the institutions versus their IT staff. In some cases this gap is as large as 20% in terms of those that rate these investments as “very effective” versus those that do not. This either speaks to unrealistic expectations, a failure to effectively communicate, or some other issue that perhaps we can explore during the upcoming Ovum Future EdTech conference.

One topic that I hope to address when I speak to the conference attendees during our session “Cloud Forecast: For Once A Very Promising Outlook” surrounds the larger general conversation in the higher education (and indeed across the entire education) sector that is quite prevalent: the general recognition that higher education is in need of significant change (transformation) – such as how education is delivered, how classrooms are organised, how information technology is leveraged, delivered, consumed, etc.  but it always comes back to how do we change the culture of higher education to support or enable true transformation – new ways of thinking, new business models and revenue sources, non-traditional programmes, competency based education models, mostly on-line programmes, etc.  – I hope to offer some ideas on the aforementioned points, and of course discuss how this cultural change is needed in order to extract maximum value from technology investments in the coming years.

For more information, please visit:
Oracle in Higher Education
Oracle Higher Education Cloud – Modern Campus. Modern Platform. 

The Author:
coleclark
Cole Clark
Global Vice President, Education and Research, Oracle

Oracle

Oracle is our Mission Critical Sponsor at Future EdTech, taking place on the 2nd – 3rd June 2015 at Millenium Gloucester Hotel in London – the first and only event in Europe enabling transformational change and innovation in higher education via technology.

Join Cole Clark, Global Vice President, Education & Research at Oracle, for his session Cloud Forecast: For Once A Very Promising Outlook at 9:40am, Wednesday, 3rd June. Please also visit the exhibition stand to find out more.

REGISTER FOR YOUR FREE PASS HERE.

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Portugal Doesn’t Like Entrepreneurs?

In this guest blog post, Vitor Pereira gives an insight into Portugal’s attitude to entrepreneurship, in the context of Smart Cities.

Registrations for Ovum’s Smart to Future Cities 2015 event are now open. After the great success of the 2014 event, the 4th Annual edition will take place at Waldorf Hilton on 28-29 April 2015, and offers complimentary attendance to city/government representatives.

smart cities portugal

Portugal, doesn’t like entrepreneurs?

Or, at least, it seemed that way until a few years ago. A crowd of Prophets of Doom bravely resisted the innovation, the boldness, the audacity and the risk of people who owe little or nothing to the country, but, who fell in love with it; with the Portuguese, the food, the landscape, the quality of life – only God knows what triggered so many passions among investors, foreign entrepreneurs and true leaders, which could have chosen large, “more developed” cities and countries, yet still fixed roots here, in this sunny rectangle, in the extreme south of the old continent.

I met one of these extraordinary entrepreneurs a little less than a year ago, at the Smart to Future Cities conference, which took place in London. Between the famous speakers, leaders of large global companies and even the Minister of Science and Technology of England, I heard, at some point, speak of Portugal. I hastened to check the program, but I did not see any connection nor identified a familiar name. I remain focused to the presentation and took some notes. And I was not the only one that was stuck to the theme. The entire room was following the words and explanations of that middle-aged speaker, already with many white hairs.

It was a dynamic and active presentation, which talked about a city. A new city for the future, sustainable and full of technology and latest generation services, ready for the most diverse and varied experiments, the Internet of Things, including some signed by names like McLaren or Microsoft. Yes, it was a city that would have true Formula 1 technology, adapted to buildings and utilities. Like me, many of the people present almost imagined the city. We were transported to its squares, to the laboratories and the streets teeming with the best professionals in the world in the most diverse sectors of activity. Sincerely, I was appreciating the idea. In fact, knowing that it was a great global project, which would be developed in my country, in Portugal, caused me chills of excitement and it seduced me too. I started to visualize a chronicle about the theme and then I searched for more details, even during the presentation. In the meantime, the speaker had finished talking and gave space to questions of assistance. And there were many of them. Curiosity, interest and enthusiasm. Applause and wishes for success. When I tried to speak with him personally to get more details, unfortunately he had already left. But I fixed his name: Steve Lewis.

steve lewis

Crossing the desert

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What’s Your Work Pattern?

SAP Jam is Silver Sponsor at Future of Work Summit. The SAP Jam solution facilitates collaboration at every level of your business. Here’s what it’s all about.

Enterprises can claim a complimentary pass for Future of Work, by registering here. Take a look at the event agenda with just one click. Ovum has a strong legacy in this area, with many years research experience in enterprise mobility, collaboration, file sync and share, mobile device management and mobile application management. We are continually working with the people and organisations who are seeing the Future of Work become a reality. Moreover, our Future of Work, Mobile First and BYOX events have seen fantastic discussion with the leading lights in this growing industry sector.

Who will be the major players in the workplace of the future? What does future workplace technology look like, and who will make best use of it? Join us to find out.

‘Is hiervoor geen betere app beschikbaar?’

183x133The second edition of Ovum Industry Congress: Europe takes place at the Amsterdam Hilton on 8 October 2014, and offers complimentary passes to enterprises, presenting a first-class speaker line-up. You can read a review of the first edition, courtesy of Computable, below.

Het Ovum Industry Congres Europe 2013 vond plaats op 2 oktober 2013 in het Mövenpick-hotel in Amsterdam. Het programma bestond uit zes onderwerpen die door de analisten van Ovum in een kort tijdsbestek werden uitgewerkt en onderbouwd met onderzoeksresultaten. Na elke sessie vond een paneldiscussieplaats met zogeheten practice leaders binnen dit vakgebied. Een hoogwaardig congres, waarbij onderzoekresultaten werden gecombineerd met de daadwerkelijke discussies in de boardroom.

ICT van buiten naar binnen

De wereld is aan het veranderen door de inzet van ict. Spraakmakende voorbeelden van deze transformatie zijn: reizen, ziekenhuizen en videoanalyses (denk aan kentekenherkenning en persoonsherkenning bij de opsporing van criminelen). Deze transformatie is gebaseerd op de ict-evolutie van een vaste ict infrastructuur naar het afnemen van dynamische zakelijke diensten. Het wordt dan ook belangrijk dat de cio een belangrijke bijdrage gaat leveren aan het ontsluiten en coördineren van de ict-kennis voor de business. Deze uitspraak is gebaseerd op het onderzoeksresultaat dat meer dan de helft van de ict-afdelingen negeert dat meer dan 60 procent van de medewerkers privémiddelen ook zakelijk gebruikt. Daarbij komt dat steeds meer zakelijke managers beslissingen nemen die voorheen door de cio werden genomen. Een intrigerende trend op het terrein van apps: in het verleden werd elke app als een openbaring ervaring. Tegenwoordig zijn gebruikers veel kritischer. Medewerkers vragen: ‘Is hiervoor geen betere app?’.

Een selectie van uitspraken uit de paneldiscussie:
• Stop met praten over ict, dit wordt onderdeel van de business, net als hr, financiën en verkoop. Be the challenger of the business;
• Het topmanagement spreekt voor 80 procent over uitvoering en voor 20 procent over innovatie;
• Bied zakelijke gebruikers een overzicht van de zakelijke meerwaarde van ict;
• Voel je verantwoordelijk voor de klant van de klant, en dit vanuit het perspectief van marketing, transparantie als vertrouwen;
• Best way of governance: you need trial and error and top-down; een successtory vanuit de praktijk is om deze wekelijks te bespreken in multidisciplinair team, dan weet iedereen zijn rol en invloed.

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The true cost of corporate IT

Guest post by Ian Whiting, Director of Interactive Services at Saggezza

Saggezza-IanWhiting (1)When it comes to making customer-facing systems faster, easier to use and more attractive, there’s always budget available. That’s because a bad customer experience means lost sales and lost revenues – anathema for the senior management team.

But while the user experience for customer-facing apps is constantly under scrutiny, many businesses still overlook the high costs of corporate systems that fail to provide a good user experience.

There’s the cost, for example, of answering a customer query too slowly and losing their business to a competitor. The cost of making a critical decision based on outdated or incomplete information. Or, with information held in multiple systems, the cost of tracking an order or pulling together a report , which – time after time – is needlessly high.

To maximize productivity and lower operating costs, your people need to be able to access the information they need easily, and complete common tasks much more quickly. The question is how.

It’s often assumed that improving the user experience of corporate systems is not an option – neither in budget terms, nor in the sheer practicality of tweaking those complex interfaces and processes to make a user’s life easier.

At Saggezza, we disagree. We believe that it’s not only possible to transform the experience of working with corporate systems, but commercially imperative.

Consider this: a retailer was spending hours tracking and resolving logistics issues. Users had to wrestle with multiple systems to pinpoint problems such as short deliveries. It took even longer to rectify them. The result: frustrated customers, frustrated users.

We worked with the retailer to transform the experience, bringing together information in disparate systems into a single intuitive interface. The result: time savings for users, greater insight into deliveries, and far happier customers. You can read about this case study in our free guide to experience-centric IT, “Logistics Rewritten by Saggezza.”

It’s no small task. It requires a combination of the interactive design techniques of the new media world, with a deep understanding business processes and enterprise applications. But when they come together, it’s a potent combination.

Find out more at www.saggezza.com
Twitter: @Saggezza_inc
LinkedIn: Linkedin.com/company/saggezza

Ian Whiting

Ian Whiting is the Director of Interactive Services at Saggezza. He brings over 10 years of experience working in the interactive design and development space. He leads a team of interactive designers, business analysts and developers who focus on user experience optimization, interactive design, and lean user-driven development. He oversees the building of custom web applications and mobility solutions, yielding business and process transformation for Saggezza enterprise clients.

Ian graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Computer Graphics Technology from Purdue University.”

Smart Cities video case study – Peterborough DNA

Read on for an excellent Smart Cities case study from Peterborough City Council, who are participating at Smart to Future Cities 2014.

Charlotte Palmer is Climate Challenge is Climate Manager from Peterborough City Council and is leading on delivery of the Peterborough DNA programme.

Peterborough DNA was created after the Peterborough was chosen as a Future City Demonstrator by the Technology Strategy Board to develop and test ways to shape a smarter city.

Peterborough DNA is being delivered by Opportunity Peterborough and Peterborough City Council focussing on growth, innovation and sustainability.

It has four main focuses of work:

Skills – Making sure Peterborough has the right skills and local talent to take advantage of emerging green markets and respond to our own sustainability challenges.

Sustainable businesses – Making sure local businesses are sustainable in all senses of the word – resilient and with low environmental impact.

Encouraging innovation – Taking entrepreneurial ideas and making them happen by providing funding, setting up an innovation hub and testing and trialling prototypes.

Open data – Cities have masses of data about population, transport, health, waste, and housing. Often this data isn’t brought together to form a whole picture. Peterborough DNA is making city data accessible and visual.

Find out more about Peterborough DNA: www.peterboroughdna.com

Twitter: @peterboroughDNA

Hear more from Charlotte on day one of the conference (29th April) at 15.25 in the Interactive Panel session on meeting the challenges of enabling smart sustainable cities.

The new industrial and communication revolution of Smart Cities

A guest Smart Cities blog post by Vitor Pereira. We’re closing in on Ovum’s Smart to Future Cities event, taking place in London on April 29-30. We’ve got representatives from 40+ global cities and administrative boroughs on the attendee list – make sure you’re there too.

The new industrial and communication revolution of Smart Cities

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(Source: irvingcommons.org)

We have observed over the past couple of years that themes related to Smart Cities have been on the rise. In 2013, for example, it was noted that it was a turning point. The emphasis of the speech was focused on the analysis of the meaning of “Smart City”, in the perception of the current state and concepts implementation phase, including market viability in the certification of many of these same concepts.

We realize that there has been a huge effort, especially on behalf of the industry and of the main economic agents in the market, in disseminating their solutions, finding partnerships in cities and within the territories, going back to 4 or 5 years ago, when huge projects of Smart Cities occupied many towns and many newspapers pages. However, as paper airplanes, many of these projects have been unsuccessful, inadequate, perhaps excessively megalomaniac, without proper intelligence or financial sustainability in their planning, guidance, implementation and monitoring. Many of them were in ineffective. But they had a contribution. They paved the way for the actual scenario. They forced the industry and key economic agents to assume a more responsible role in organizing the concepts and their implementation.

Also the institutional partners, such as Governments and cities, with the integration of some sustainability objectives in their plans of action, put aside many of the infamous megalomanias of the past years. Many of the major world cities today references in the panorama of Smart Cities chose the path of creativity and offered an active role to citizens and, not least, also opened paths of innovation and economic development, through the focus on entrepreneurship, startups and private projects, even more fundamental, promoting partnerships with small and medium enterprises already in possession of know-how accumulated over the years and because of their small size and flexibility, many of them managed to stay floating during the turbulent waters of the recent crisis. They evolved in a sustainable way, hired the right professional staff and managed to also perform and demonstrate some relevant projects that are of utmost importance nowadays.

On the other hand, universities and educational institutions also noticed the need, in many cases to join efforts in research and development of new products that effectively adjust to the real world, to cities and citizens.

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European Parliament report maps Smart Cities in the European Union

Guest blog post from Vitor Pereira. Original post on the Smart Welcome Lab website here. All six of the smartest cities listed will be represented at Ovum’s Smart to Future Cities in London on April 29-30 2014, along with cities from all over the world.

atelier-transportationThe European Parliament has just published a report mapping Smart Cities in the European Union. This is an attempt to identify the number of ‘smart cities’ and their activities across Europe. As usual, this report is confusing, weighty and difficult to summarize or remove excerpts. But defines a smart city as “a city looking to solve public problems through technologies developed and implemented on the basis of multi-stakeholder partnerships”.

This is one aspect that is intended to be a more concrete definition describing in detail the types of actions and areas of intervention, which are now more recognizable:

  • Smart Economy
  • Smart Mobility
  • Smart Environment
  • Smart People
  • Smart Living
  • Smart Governance

Interestingly, smart city is defined in this study as any city that has developed activities in these areas. It is a broad definition and it is not surprising that in 468 cities of about 100,000 inhabitants 240 ‘smart cities’ (about half) are identified. Larger cities tend to be capable of being smarter than smaller ones.

But there are some issues related to the methodology used by investigators to identify these cities and their activities. They used published information, the cities own Web pages as well as information, if any, of EU-funded projects, specifically for the Smart Cities theme. They themselves recognize that there is information that might have been ignored, referring to cities, for example, that are not adept at advertising and communicating or even sharing their work.

The researchers analyzed different types of actions and concluded that the actions related to ‘environment’ and ‘mobility’ are the most common with 33% and 21% of smart initiatives, respectively.

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How do hospital CIOs deal with the challenges of BYOD and the Internet of Things?

Smart Strategies for Healthcare Technology

There was a very interesting insight from Andrew Litt, Chief Medical Officer at Dell’s Healthcare division on Computerworld recently, about how hospital CIOs are dealing with the dual challenges of BYOD and the Internet of Things. Even though he is US-based, many of the themes are universal. The article is reproduced below.

To find out how you can deal with and take advantage of IT modernisation in the UK health service, join us in London next month for Smart Strategies for Healthcare Technology, wherein you can discuss:

  • Transforming Healthcare with Knowledge and IT
  • Clinician And Patient Empowerment
  • Health Informatics
  • Sharing Information across Health and Social Care

With your peers, with Ovum’s analysts, and with expert speakers from the likes of BCS Health, Berkshire Healthcare Foundation Trust, East Kent Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, GP Care (Bristol), HSCIC, NHS England Northern Senate, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust and University Hospitals Birmingham.

Download the full brochure here, to view all of the topics to be covered.

The event is free to attend for health professionals, so secure your place today, and we look forward to meeting you next month.

Mr Litt’s thoughts are below:

‘There are two trends in healthcare that should give hospital IT professionals pause: BYOD and the Internet of Things. The bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend is certainly not new, but hospitals are still figuring out how to navigate the security concerns. While BYOD is a trend in the corporate world, too, there are two major differences for hospitals. First, the folks accessing corporate networks are, almost exclusively, employees and they use corporate-owned devices for most of that access. Second, when they do use their own devices, they are mostly reading email, not accessing sensitive data.

Hospitals, however, have hundreds of physicians who are not employees who access their networks, and they want to use their own devices to log into applications to read medical records (containing some of the most sensitive data on the planet), order tests and prescribe medications. The idea of non-employees accessing data and applications of that level of sensitivity on personally owned devices would scare the daylights out of most corporate CIOs. And hospital CIOs are equally worried about the broader security concerns inherent with BYOD. How does one monitor or control the apps on all the different devices and make sure they are not a “back door” into sensitive systems and data?

The Internet of Things (no matter what you think of the moniker), is related to BYOD in that it could, depending on how hospitals set up their systems, introduce a vast array of new access points to the network. The “things” involved that concern hospitals are patient monitoring and diagnostic devices that are Internet enabled. Again, a very scary thought when you consider the sensitivity of the data that is being transmitted. While these wireless medical devices currently exist, they now communicate by way of Bluetooth, transmitting data via a smartphone or computer that relays the data to the endpoint. Once these devices become Wi-Fi enabled, however, that buffer will disappear, creating yet another access point to the network…’

Read the full article on Computerworld.

Joan Miller, Director of UK Parliamentary ICT, on the digital divide, online voting, BYOD and hackathons

joan-millerA recent interview with Computer Weekly magazine saw Joan Miller, Director of UK Parliamentary ICT, share her thoughts on how Parliament should be using technology today, as well as the challenges of digital in an evolving world. The interview is below.

Joan Miller will be participating in an Industry Leaders Panel Discussion at Public Sector Enterprise Insights on 13th March (free passes for public sector executives), which can be summarised thus:

Leadership, Innovation and Driving Business Goals Forward

  • Successfully supporting a more agile organisation
  • Progress on Urban vs. Rural Landscape – A realistic map for the future
  • The future – Exploring opportunities mobility and engagement
  • Public Sector Networks
  • M2M and the future requirements on IT capabilities
  • Skills needed for the future

The other speakers on the panel are: Bill McCluggage, Irish Government CIO, Department of Public Expenditure & Reform; Michael Eaton, Deputy Director, ICT Business Strategy & Planning, Welsh Government; Chris Price, Chief Information Officer, West Midlands Police Authority; Stephan Conaway, Chief Information Officer, London Borough of Brent.

Here are Joan’s thoughts:

Miller says she is excited about the prospect of a [digital democracy] commission: “Technology has become so much a part of how people work these days, not just an IT issue, it’s a business issue.”

She says the commission will allow MPs to think through the impact of current technology practices and future trends.

“I think the commission is an opportunity to look at the challenges,” she says. “The challenges are in an evolving world – are we ready for that evolving world?”

She believes there are many issues for Parliament to debate, including the use of technology and how that will change the way Parliamentarians works.

Her job role is to manage the internal technology in Parliament, providing all the applications, systems and devices used by the House of Commons and House of Lords.

She says we are living in a world overloaded with information from modern technology. Parliamentarians need to consider big data, how they select the information they need, which is useful, and how they will engage this information with the public.

“I think the mechanisms for accessing information has become easier, but the information has become more dense,” she says.

The digital divide

One concern the commission is determined to address is that of the digital divide. Society is divided by those who are connected to the internet and use it regularly, and those who do not use the internet and social networks. The government is aware of the problem, and is working through the commission and the Government Digital Service to solve it.

“Many MPs are using social networks and connecting directly with many members of the public,” says Miller. “That also has the opportunity to exclude people who are not involved with technology as much. What do we do with about the population who do or can’t have access to it?”

But Miller – who is hoping to provide evidence to the speaker’s commission – says the digital divide is not a new problem and has always been a challenge.

In the 1990s, Miller worked in local government at a time when there was talk about changing services in line with the development of the internet. “I was working in social services and providing services for older people,” she says. “It was quite difficult to see where the internet could help older people who didn’t have a computer.”

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