Mobile Application Management: the Apperian perspective

Apperian is the Mobile Application Management sponsor at Future of Work Summit. Alan Murray, SVP of Products, has been sharing his thoughts on the enterprise mobility industry, as well as what Mobile Application Management entails. Over to Alan…

Alan

1. What is the current state of the enterprise mobility vendors?

2013 saw a number of acquisitions and messaging shifts in the mobility marketplace. Some companies that started as MDM vendors are now expanding their messaging to include MAM and MCM, but most are just a thin veneer of capabilities draped over an MDM platform. These “do-it-all” platforms, in our experience, can’t deliver on the promises made by their marketing departments to their customers. On the other end of the spectrum, pure-play companies specializing in particular aspects of enterprise mobility are allowing organizations to select best-of-breed solutions. Some specialize in security, app reputation analysis or, like Apperian, providing MAM.

2. What trends are you seeing in this space?

The biggest trend we see is the shift from devices to apps. With IT replacing their Blackberry Enterprise Server with any number of commoditized MDM vendors, mobile IT leaders are now looking for transformative ways to use mobility. While IT is no longer panicking over device management, they are starting to realize that trying to use MDM technology to manage and secure apps doesn’t work. When we exhibit at enterprise mobility trade shows, the discussions we have with attendees now, as compared to a year ago, have universally gone from “how do we secure our corporate devices” to “how do we build, manage and secure enterprise apps?”. We no longer find ourselves having to spell out the the acronym “MAM”, although there is still a lot of education needed for organizations to realize that MAM is more than just a private app store and that the real value lies within the management of the app lifecycle.

3. There seems to be confusion on the definition of MAM – Can you help clarify?

The term “MAM” has unfortunately been watered down by many mobile vendors and people in the media to simply mean a private app store. But the App Store is really the “last mile” of enabling a mobile strategy. We have a broader and deeper aspiration for MAM to encompass managing the entire mobile app lifecycle from development to deployment without regard or reliance on a device management infrastructure. MAM is about driving innovation through mobility and ultimately driving adoption of corporate apps.

4. Have you seen any new or unique use cases for MAM?

One reoccurring trend we’ve seen is organizations using Apperian’s MAM solution to facilitate user testing for consumer-facing apps internally. Organizations are able to deploy an app to thousands of internal end-users for testing before it becomes part of a public app store. Through our app policies, an administrator can view statistics through usage tracking to better understand app download and usage behavior, while end-users can provide feedback directly through our app store. Our App Remote Control policy allows an admin to remotely view and control the user interface of an app, therefore providing live support for troubleshooting and ultimately saving time and expenses.

5. How can Apperian help?

Apperian’s cloud-based mobile app management platform helps to secure and manage corporate mobile apps and data in the enterprise. Our solution ensures ongoing compliance with security policies and simplifies managing all stages of the mobile app lifecycle, streamlining the complexity of supporting ever-changing versions of apps, operating systems and devices – whether personal (BYOD) or corporate owned. Through a seamless user experience that doesn’t require intrusive technology on user devices, Apperian powers the world’s leading enterprise app stores for hundreds of thousands of users.

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One response to “Mobile Application Management: the Apperian perspective

  1. Thanks for sharing this. have you heard about myyello ?

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